Posts Tagged ‘Return on Investment’

Online Display Advertising Expenditures Increase Q1 2009

July 20, 2009

TNS Media Intelligence reports U.S. Advertising expenditures declined 14.2% in the first quarter of 2009.

From the TNS report:

Local media suffered most with aggregate expenditures sinking 25.4 percent in the first quarter of 2009. The rate of decline was similar across Spot TV (-27.5 percent), Local Newspapers (-25.1 percent) and Local Radio (-26.8 percent). Each of these segments was ravaged by deep spending cutbacks in core categories such as automotive, retail and local services.

For national media, combined ad spending fell 8.5 percent versus a year ago. Within this segment, performance was sharply defined along the lines of print versus television versus online.

National Newspapers (-28.5 percent), B-to-B Magazines (-25.5 percent), Consumer Magazines (-19.2 percent) and other print media were clustered on one track and their revenue declines were driven by fewer ad pages.

Network TV (-4.2 percent), Cable TV (-2.7 percent) and Syndication (+0.2 percent) occupied a middle tier and each of these saw business improve slightly at the end of the quarter, paced by Motion Picture and Restaurant category spending.  At an exclusive upper level, Internet display expenditures grew 8.2 percent as telecom, travel and local retail advertisers expanded their online marketing programs.

Q1 2009 Measured Ad Spending

Q1 2009 Measured Ad Spending

In addition to the increase in online display advertising expenditures, Dean DeBiase, CEO, TNS Media has alos identified several other noteworthy advertising industry trends:

“…some sectors and brands are approaching a depressed marketplace as an opportunity to gain share and are increasing spending accordingly.

The advertising industry, too, while struggling, is understanding this is a period for innovation and we are seeing efforts to reboot their approach through the advent of new technologies and tools such as addressable advertising, and the first steps to integrating ad measurement in a synergistic manner across all media platforms.”

Marketers who have been through the peaks and troughs of economic cycles before surely share DeBiase’s perspectve and thus have been busy taking market share through improved advertising measurement technologies and the return on investment these tools can produce.

Social Media’s Return on Investment?

June 17, 2009

I was fishing in the Tweet stream yesterday when I caught the following job posting for a social media coordinator.

Social Media Coordinator

Social Media Coordinator

Several attributes of this job description struck me as odd if not misinformed.

The job description sounds more like a wish list composed by someone in Human Resources rather than by someone who actually knew what they were requesting.

The idea that the future Social Media Coordinator position holder has to report to the “Manager – Interactive Projects” runs counter to the list of skills the job description requires.

Any individual who has experience performing the following “social media” laundry list of tasks   including the non-social media related disciplines of search engine optimization and web analytics while generating a return on investment would by definition already be a Manager – Interactive Projects – if not considerably more.

Responsibilities of the position will include the support of Interactive initiatives regarding online Social Media (SM), web analytics/research, news distribution and Search Engine Optimization (SEO).   In addition, responsibilities of this role will include:

·         Strategy, planning and direction to content managers and maintenance of Social Media initiatives including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, YouTube and others

·         Educating consultants regarding new technology and the Social Media environment

·         Utilizing technology to research and measure company Social Media status and ROI

·         Interaction with corporate and regional company representatives to promote news and activities of the company

·         Management of all company related Social Media registrations

·         Providing regular reports of web site traffic analytics

·         Interaction with company Studio Team to manage and promote a variety of news and activity videos/broadcasts

The position’s “Utilizing technology to research and measure company Social Media status and ROI” requirement indirectly poses a valid question yet one few if any company’s understand or can let alone quantify – “What is the Return on Investment in Social Media?”

Any search engine marketer or SEO worth their salt can answer the Return on Investment question, I doubt a majority of the new breed of social media marketers can.

Maximizing Your Google Adwords Return on Investment

May 31, 2009

The Inside Adwords blog team has posted six tactics for maximizing an Adwords Advertiser’s return on investment.

The six tactics Adwords suggests are:

1. Focus Adwords ads on low prices and savings.

Consumers care about prices more than ever, especially on day-to-day purchases. When someone searches on a particular product, you know they’re interested; by using your ad to tell them that you’ve got the highest quality and the best price, you’re more likely to earn their click. Update your ad text to focus on low prices, good values, and timely promotions.

Adwords Low Prices and Savings

Adwords Low Prices and Savings

2. Use value-related keywords.

It’s open season for bargain hunters. To reach these deal-conscious consumers, add appropriate price- and discount-related keywords. Try the AdWords Search-based Keyword Tool and Search Query Performance report to find and higher-performing keywords that people are actually searching on.

Value Related Keywords

Value Related Keywords

3. Make sure ad groups are targeted and relevant.

Ads perform best when their ad text reflects the ad group’s keywords; this makes ads more relevant to their intended audience. Make sure that both the text and the keywords in each ad group focus on a specific topic or product. For instance, an ad group about “tennis sneakers” will generally perform better than a broader ad group about “sneakers.”

Targeted Relevant Ad Groups

Targeted Relevant Ad Groups

4. Don’t waste money on irrelevant clicks.

The wrong keywords can attract people who are looking for products you don’t offer. Use negative keywords to filter out traffic that’s not related to your offering. The Search Query Performance report can help you identify potential negative keywords by showing which queries have triggered your ads.

Irrelevant Clicks

Irrelevant Clicks

5. Make it easy for customers to buy.

Since people are spending more time comparing products and services online, make it easier for them to find what they’re looking for and buy from your site. Use the best Destination URL to send visitors directly to the page about the product or service promoted in your ad.

Make It Easy To Buy

Make It Easy To Buy

6. Focus budget on high-performers.

To get the most out of your campaigns, focus your time and resources on the keywords, ads, and ad groups that are driving the most value for your spend. To determine what’s performing best for you, consider Google’s free Conversion Tracking tool.

High Performing Keywords

High Performing Keywords