Posts Tagged ‘World Wide Web’

Linkedin Plus Twitter Equals Who Knows What?

November 1, 2008

I just added my Twitter account into my Linkedin account profile after noticing Owen Frager had added it to his “what he is working on” Linkedin updates.

Twitter TimCohn

Twitter TimCohn

Pretty cool Owen…

Linkedin TimCohn

Linkedin TimCohn

I had been meaning for some time to write about the importance of “owning and controlling your brand” whether personal or corporate in the most promising emerging social platforms for both offensive and defensive purposes

Appropriately, I first became acquainted with Owen after having posted on Domain King Rick Schwartz’ blog

Name.com

Name.com

about how I missed the first offensive opportunity to control “my personal brand” – albeit my not so unique name – on that newfangled social platform called the world wide web way back in 1996.

Tim Cohn

Tim Cohn

Granted, its hard to gauge in advance which social platforms will have the largest audience and reach after filtering out all their noise.

However, not registering your “brand” in their databases early on can lead to remorse later on.

If you haven’t done so already, register your own brandname.com / companyname.com and create accounts for the same names in MySpace, Facebook, Twitter and Flickr – if you can…

The same holds true for individuals.

Sign up for a Linkedin account under your personal brand: your name.

Don’t be disappointed though if you can’t. If yours is a common name – it surely has long since been registered.

Registering your brands with these sites may not make you any money in the short term, but if and when social media platforms ever figure out how to make money for themselves let alone for their advertisers and users, wouldn’t it be better for you to control your brand name(s) on the most successful social media sites instead of someone else?

Political Message Metrics

September 3, 2008

Attributor.com has developed an interesting method for measuring political messages and their efficacy by identifying how well and often a particular candidates message travels ie., is copied and pasted across the web.

It looks like Attributor originally developed their service for content publishers who were looking to track and potentially monetize their “re-purposed” content.

Since the world wide web is the world’s largest copying machine, its reasonable to conclude the messages that are copied and re-purposed the most across the world wide web are those messages which reached and resonated with the most members of the world wide web’s audience.

I think it would be hard to argue there is no larger – albeit fragmented – audience in the world.

Other than sales produced, what better way to measure the reach and efficacy of a particular message whether it be a political message or brand message than to see how often it is repeated and in this case – copied?

Attribute’s system helps publishers monitor, find and measure copied content.

Shouldn’t every web content producer be using tools like Attributor to measure the impact I dare say content theft has on their bottom line?

Screen shots from the Attributor demo:

Monitor Content

Monitor Content

Monitor Content

Find Content

Find Content

Find Content

Copied Content

Copied Content

Copied Content


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